First blog

My name is Per Kristian, I am 22 years old from Vinstra, Gudbrandsdalen, but I am currently studying Digital Culture at the university in Bergen. My blog will be used to tell my Dikult 103 story, mostly what I learn and create during this semester, but it will also be about my thoughts around the subject and the things we learn.

Dikult 103 will be a challenging subject for me since I am not much of a social media type of person, I have not posted or shared anything on Facebook, I have never had a Twitter account before I started with Dikult 103. Soo posting on a blog regularly will be a challenge for me, but it is a challenge I am looking forward to because it will be a brand-new experience. This Dikult course is also done in a very different way than what I am used to, and honestly not what I prefer, it is a lot more interactive than anything I have ever been a part of, but in the end, I might end up liking it, who knows. Soo all in all I have mixed feelings about this course, but I am open to new things and experiences.

I have always been interested in digital art, so I am looking forward to some aspects of the course, but I have never been much of a creator or artist, I mostly browse websites like reddit or imgur to enjoy other people’s work. I have used tools like photoshop before during some other courses, but it was just the basic stuff, nothing extraordinary. I also have some experience with coding, which I enjoy when it works, I took some courses during high school and then some more coursed when I lived in Trondheim, but again it was nothing huge or special.

This blog post might come in short, but frankly I am not sure what more to write about in my first post, so I will wrap this up now.

Hello World!

To many the idea of coding, using math, logic and nerd power to create something sounds like magic. Looking at sites like Facebook or games like Skyrim you’ll feel overwhelmed by the mere prospect of trying to replicate it. I as a programmer do to. The reason I most often hear things like “this is why I don’t do code” is because people see some code which a person has worked on for hours/weeks/years. Even simple code can be made to look intimidating. Refusing to stick to naming conventions or using fussy logic will immediately make whatever your making look like something out of 2001 a space Odyssey.

Today I want to touch on this and give a few tips on how to start getting into coding, specifically basic HTML code. Most of my methods are however not rooted in code, but rather project management and pedagogy. So, if you’re just here to see how I teach myself stuff skip any code heavy parts and focus on why I’m choosing different methods and sites. As with everything else, I’m not an expert. These are observations ant tricks which I’ve picked up during my three years as a programming intern, lead programmer and project manager. My tenure as project lead led to the closure of the studio and to the extension of my three-year bachelor to a four year one, so these lessons came at a price.

First of a few links:

Why advice is dangerous, and you should take any with a grain of salt:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miwrDpbb25Q

Why only looking at the successful people is a bad idea:

https://youarenotsosmart.com/2013/05/23/survivorship-bias/

Why you’ll probably never feel comfortable with your current skill:

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-banish-imposter-syndrome-and-embrace-everything-you-deserve

Okay so you want to learn something, this time it’s basic coding. This might just be for the joy of learning in and of itself, it might be because you want to try your hand at making coding art. Well I got new for you, this might take some time. It depends on how complex and out there you want to be. If you want to make a bad first-person shooter in Unity it will maybe take you a day in unity using their premade assets. You’ll have a project which runs, but you’ll be at their mercy. So instead we’ll start with something small. By starting small you’ll get a better grasp on how the basics work.

So lets head over to my favourite website currently present on the world wide web http://sau.no/. Sau.no is a small site which tells you everything a metropolitan need to know about sheep.

The text says:

Sheep are stupid animals.

Sheep are food for among others, wolves.

Simple and clean. All text is cantered, there is a picture and a link to another html site, wolf.no. At your current level, can you replicate this site without looking at it source code? If yes, then this tutorial is probably not for you. Scroll down for the epic conclusion or follow along and wince as I misrepresent coding and learning methods. If no, then please stay a while and listen play.

First off, this site is old and breaks a few conventions in web development, but trust me, caring about conventions and correct code to early will only stop you from having fun. And having fun while learning is paramount. First of you’ll need something to write your code in. I can recommend notepad++ as a good starting tool (I still use it for quick development and people who say that it’s trash are only thinking of large scope projects). If you don’t want to download anything you can just use any old text editor like notepad to follow along. Once you have notepad++ up and running you will see something like this:

notepad++

This will be where the magic happens and as we know, all magicians cheat. So, lets cheat, go back to sau.no, right click an empty part of the screen and choose “View Page Source”, this will open a new window showing you all the code needed to create this marvel of a website. First of we have what are called tags.

Tags helps our computer run things in the right order while also classifying what we are doing in a computer readable way. The first tag we encounter is the <html> tag. This bad boy tells the computer that the following code is supposed to be html. This first tag is linked to the very last tag of the document, the </html> tag. The / symbolizes that we are no longer playing with html. If you’ve coded a bit before you might be rocking a bit back and forth right now. Where is the !DOCTYPE? Well in never time we add a declaration at the start of any html document to signify what version of html we are using. Never versions have many fancy smancy things it can do, but sau.no is so pure (and old… and mouldy) that it does not need to declare anything. If you really want to be proper, then look at this site to see how and why DOCTYPE is a good thing:

https://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_doctype.asp

In the link you’ll also encounter the other basic tags which comprise a basic html page. The head, title and body tag. The head tag is where all your meta and dark magic usually goes, for now just thing of it as a place to add the title tag

The title tag is always placed in the head tag and for good reason, nothing you write in the head tag should show on your site. The title tag rather, changes the text in your tab/window so that anyone visiting your soon to be brilliant site knows what’s up.

The body tag is where all your content goes, all text, images etc goes here.

So, let’s set up the essentials. Write or copy paste the code from the sau.no source code into your editor (notepad++ and the like). Remove everything which is not one of our four known tags. Now your code should look something like this:

sau1

The body tag has some weird colour code, but lets ignore that for now because it’s time to take a look at our creation! Save your html code wherever you want, I recommend making a specific folder for the project. Remember to save your file with the .html ending! If you save it as sheep.txt for example it will not be recognized as html code. Once saved, open it up in your favourite browser and behold what you’ve created!

….

Not much to look at for the moment, but your tab should now read ww.sau.no. Let’s change this by adding some stuff inside the body tag. We’ll do this in the quickest manner, so just go ahead and copy paste everything from the source code into your document. Now you got a center tag, some br tags, fonts! An img tag and a sprinkle of a’s and b’s.

Every last one of these tags are here for a reason and this is where we’ll get into why this is a good way to learn coding. Every coding language has what’s called documentation. Documentation is the rules and functions of your chosen language and the best way I’ve found to grasp the basics is by finding simple projects and slowly read up on every piece one by one. You might have guessed what the center tag does from it’s name, but google html center tag. This will most likely bring you to wc3schools page on the topic. You’ll find that it’s not supported by newer versions of html and that you should use css. This is what I’ve dubbed a breadcrumb. These breadcrumbs are future reading topics to explore after you’ve understood your current project. I’ll probably make a short tutorial on how to use css to style your page later, but for now just remember that the center tag changes the layout of your html page and should therefore probably be done with css.

The same goes for the font tag where we find our second breadcrumb of interest. Under compatibility notes we see a snippet of css code where they use something called a p tag. Whenever I stumble upon an unknow tag which I’m not using I note it down somewhere and check it out later.

So, after reading up one the different tags used in the source you should know that most of the clutter is styling code. Centring code, adding fonts, resizing and adding space. The only two tags that seems to really belong here is the a and img tag. The img tag tells your computer that you want to grab a picture with a specific name and size. Lets go ahead and download the picture of the sheep from the site and place it in the same folder as sheep.html file. If you place it somewhere else, it will not be found. This is due to file hierarchy playing a role in how we fetch images. The src=”sau.jpg” text indicates that you file is named exactly that. If you renamed the file you will have to use the exact name that you chose. If you wanted to have a folder of images instead of having them in the same space as the sheep.html file you would have to do something like scr=”folder/sau.jpg” or if you wanted to have your .hmtl file in a folder it would be scr”//sau.jpg”. the double slashes pushes you one folder up, again google is your friend.

Lastly, we have the a tag, which is a simple link. Inside the href you’ll find url to whatever site you want to point at. Let’s change this to the url of this blog so that I get more clicks. Now it really makes no sense to have the word ulv (wolf) pointing at my site so let’s change the word to “narrer” (jesters). And with that you have a complete site! A near perfect rip-off.

narr

Sligthly varied results are expected

On the way you learned the very basics of html. You have also picked up quite a few bad habits. Styling in the html code instead of in css and omitting the !DOCTYPE, but you have made something. And by making this ripoff you now have a few breadcrumbs to follow. What is css and how do it use it to style my html? Can I use something else than text as a link? How do I remove the stupid blue colour from links? Can I use other images with different sizes? Is there a better way to make headlines than size? Can I imbed auto playing music or YouTube videos?

By starting small you will build up a vocabulary and knowledge of how things work. Don’t make something perfect from the start. Use old faulty methods if they work and change it out once you’ve learned why the new method is better.  Make a note of what sites suggests you should do instead, but wait with the upgrading for later. The goal is learning and having fun, not making something a seasoned coder can look at and musingly say “hmm yes this is clean code”. By experience coders never really do this even if the code is sound.

That is the end of my needlessly long tutorial to replicate an old website from the late 90s. While it might be much MUCH faster to just copy paste the code and add more stuff on top I hope that you’ve gleaned an insight into how you can learn from the process and why it’s helpful to take your time in creating basic stuff. Do you have any good tricks for making learning fun? Maybe you already have a tutorial for making twitter bots or gifs? Feel free to post them in the comment section or @ me on twitter and maybe I’ll make a post about trying them out.

I participated in Global Game Jam 2018. A post about memes and bit sized ideas.

This weekend I spent three days completing a game with five other people, but another person from my class did the same thing and also blogged about it so I’ll let the post about my experience simmer a bit longer before I post about it here. You can check out Elias’s blog about his experience here: https://eliasblogorg.wordpress.com/.

What I want to a talk about this time is something I eluded to in an earlier post, memes.

doing it right

The Wikipedia page on memes has very eloquent and well formulated definition.

“A meme is an idea, behaviour, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture … A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme.”

While the idea of memes is far from new, the popularity of the world wide web has made the term highly relevant in our everyday lives. Codes of conduct manifests in the forms of memes, filter bubbles expect certain reactions which to a wider audience would seem random or carry little to no information. For anyone new to the twitch chat, Kappa might just be one of a thousand silly faces, but in the community, it’s prescribed meaning. Any statement containing the Kappa emoji is sarcastic or in some way over the top. Complex issues can be treated in a light-hearted manner by captioning your thoughts over a picture of a penguin.

awkpenguin

In older times memes were harder to transmit. One of my favourites is the story of Martin Luther and the anabaptists. Luther as you might know proclaimed his dissatisfaction in the way the Catholic church handled its affairs. He also proposed the radical idea that the bible should be translated from Latin to German so that everyone, not just the priests, could read the holy word of God. While this was not a new idea, plenty of people argued against the church before Luther (and were killed off), but Luther had one tool available to him that the ones who came before had not. The printing press. He could share and spread his ideas to more than the people living in the same town. Sermons and arguments where printed and distributed among the populous and even if the church had gotten to him, they were powerless to stop the printing of his heretic ideals. One of the results of this spread where the creation of a radical version of Protestantism/Lutherism, the anabaptists.

Martin Luther

This religious group was built around another idea Luther had thrown about, that the everyday man could not only read, but understand the bible in their own way. Through debates and a pinch of the expected religious spirit this was interpreted that anyone could be a prophet which in turn ended up with one of my favourite moments in history where about ten thousand poor people took over a city, made it a pseudo communistic city state which promptly descended into a burning mess. For anyone interested in reading more about the topic I urge you to listen to Hardcore History’s “prophets of doom” episode or just reading the Wikipedia article.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster_rebellion

https://www.dancarlin.com/product/hardcore-history-48-prophets-of-doom/

In both the instance of the awkward penguin meme and the teachings of Martin Luther we find complex ideas and thoughts represented in a much simple from. By boiling down ideas to the core they have gained the ability of being shared much faster than the whole truth. Nearly every instance of education does this and for good reason. Trying to explain calculus all at once would be an impossible task, but by cutting it down into manageable bits we can over time paint a picture of the whole. The problem is in the “over time” part. If you where do drop out in the fourth grade, your view of what calculus is will be extremely incomplete and in many ways wrong. If you’ve only had depression and social angst explained to you in two sentences a pop, you’ll have a very naïve view indeed.

antifeminism

So, what happens when our form of communication more and more resembles memes? When most of our impressions and understandings of a subject comes from Twitter, Reddit, YouTube, blogs and 4chan? Where most debates happen in a filter bubble or in anonymous discussions where the participants are ever changing and there is no possibility of creating a lasting vocabulary understood and agreed upon by both sides. I’m far from having any academic understanding of these implications, but instead I have subjective observations which I can build a case on. Not a strong case, but maybe something to build upon later.

antimenist

This quick pace and aimless discussion style invites the use of the “us or they” mentality. Either you’re a feminist or your one of “them”. Wither you’ve swallowed the red pill or you are part of “them”. You agree, or you are one of “them”. By splitting any debate into us or them you paint a black and white world view. Any question becomes a Boolean result of true or false. Fact or fake news. By having this mentality, groups are invited to prove the other side wrong instead of proving yourself right.

I have myself done this plenty of times and I still do. Certain ideas or ideals are cemented in my mind as undisputed truths which I’ll never let go. I have however, tried to be more critical of my “simple fact”, but as neuroscience has shown us, evaluating the brain using the brain is damned difficult. Compound on top of this the social pressure of not going against your “gang” and introspection ends up being a lofty goal. You can see this social pressure to conform to an idea everywhere. Feminist disagreeing and falling out over the topic of “are we using #metoo to much?” or the alt rights “is it okay to be gay if you don’t show it?”. One missed step or poorly phrased thought can leave you shunned from your community.

truefalse

#HasJustineLandedYet is a digital artefact which haunts me every time I act in public. Jon Ronson has an excellent ted talk about the vindictive and pleasurable experience it is to tear someone down. How one person can become a meme in themselves. The talk capsulate how Justine Sacco went from a nobody to the embodiment of white privilege and how Twitter went about solving the issue. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAIP6fI0NAI&t

There are many conclusions that can be drawn from my musings. The easiest might be that social media makes us dumber and we should all go back to our Nokia 3310, but might that not be to simple a solution to a complex problem? Maybe if the problem was as simple as our bit sized understanding of it, but sadly I don’t think it is. Maybe we just have to do the same as we do with so many other complex problems. Try to educate one another and ourselves. By keeping in mind who we can hurt and how we blind ourselves. If we consider that the scumbag Steve meme is a picture of an actual person before we share it, maybe we’ll find ourselves in situation a tiny bit better than we find today.

wholesome meme

 

 

 

Evolution

I’ve lately been reading about how the computer age started; Extending a lot further back than most people think. I’m not going to write about the details here and now, but after seeing pictures of the ENIAC and then assembling my new workstation, I find it amazing to see how far we’ve progressed in computer technology.

MPE-6983-3

Comment sections vs. Facebook

Today was a very special day. Today I handed in my master thesis in Digital Culture. I’ve been researching comments on news articles, trying to determine what is the difference between commenting on news articles on a newspapers comment section and its Facebook page. And by the end of it, I ended up creating a website where i present the research, as well as a creative work illustrating the difference between comments on the two platforms, called Comments and Platforms.

Now, after reading and researching comments for what seems like forever, I am left with a new outlook on commenting. I used to think, as many others, that comment sections were vile and horrible places, filled with racism and sexism. But this has not been my experience while researching them. I have read many comments over the past year, and read a lot about them, and I have rarely seen what I would call uncivil behavior. Now, it may be that I’ve been lucky: that the newspaper I have been studying has very civil readers (doubtful), or that its moderators are quick and effective at deleting what may be a swarm of derogatory comments. The latter is more likely, though if that was commonplace I would expect to see signs of it: weird “gaps” in a communication, like replies to comments that aren’t there.

What I have found among the thousands of comments I have read is mostly positive or neutral. There are certainly quite a few idiots writing comments on news stories, but there are also some genuinely informative comments that have shed new light on a story. And of course, there are those comments that are just entertaining to read. And even if 80-90% of the comments are pretty much useless, isn’t that also true for media in general? I’m sure that most of us scroll by most of the content presented to us on Facebook, news sites, YouTube, Spotify or wherever, only being interested in a fraction of it.

I have come to believe that comments, and the comment sections they are written in, can be quite valuable. The world wide web gives everyone a voice. But comment sections gives everyone a voice – and an audience of as much as millions of potential readers. And journalists have reported that comments have positively impacted their work in several ways, including providing enhanced critical reflection and new story leads (Graham and Wrigth 2015).

But there is a problem. Even if I haven’t seen much of it myself, uncivil behavior in comment sections do exist. And anonymity is often blamed for this – wrongly, according to my own research. So many news sites began to use a Facebook plugin to power their comment sections – requiring commenters to user their Facebook profile. And worse: it means that it’s becoming more and more common for a Facebook account to be reqired for participation in public debates.

Some news sites have decided to close their comment sections in favor of using their Facebook pages to engage with readers. This was the reason for my own research. I think it’s important to know what such a move to Facebook is doing to the democratic quality of commenting. What I found was that there is more conversations, debates, questions, arguments and informative comments on a newspaper’s comment section that its Facebook page. Comments on Facebook are shorter, more reactive, and rarely fuel discussions.

So the quality of commenting is much lower on Facebook than a newspapers comment section. But what does improve on Facebook is the spreadability of an article because of the higher number of interactions through commenting, likes and reactions – all of which are automatically shared and spread to other people. The cynical side of me is tempted to think that this is the real reason for some news sites to shift their focus to Facebook.

In the end, the question is what do we wan’t with comment sections. Do we want them to be a place for public debate? Do we want them to be a safe space? Or do we want them to be removed because they’re not really good for anything? Personally, I’m in favor of keeping and trying to improve those platforms that facilitate public debate. And what I have found is that comment sections, even with their shortcomings, are better at facilitating public debate than commenting on articles on Facebook.

 

Sources

Graham, Todd, and Scott Wright. 2015. ‘A Tale of Two Stories from “Below the Line”: Comment Fields at the Guardian’. The International Journal of Press/Politics 20, no. 3: 317-338. DOI: 10.1177/1940161215581926

 

Oh, hello there!

Hello, you gorgeous people!

My name is Markus Mjelde and I’m a student at the University of Bergen and I’m very interested in digital art and social networking. I’m studying Digital Culture and this term I’m having Networked Narratives (#NetNarr) which thus far seems very interesting and fun. We’ve been making memes, tweeting and even started this blog! The content creating will continue on every week, and I’m going to be posting updates here every weekend around the subjects I have this term. I will also be showing my progression within digital art and social networking.

My digital life right now is mostly communicating with friends all over the world and playing games with them every now and then. I am also slowly beginning to get addicted to Twitter as I like the feedback I’m getting there, it gives a small sense of accomplishment within the social network. Thus far my best tweet has been this Tweet.

Network Narratives seems like it’s going to be helping a lot with getting contacts online and experiencing social media in a professional and fun way. We are learning about blogging and even though it’s not said directly, teaching us stability in our content to maintain a continous stream of followers. Our task is to post a blog surrounding the subjects of the course every week so we learn to have a system within our studies and have a stream of steady content for everyone interested in reading the blogs.

I’m going to be sharing my progress and evolution around my digital artworks. I have made some artworks before I started this course during my last four years doing media and photography at school, and during that time I was doing a lot of community and server managing within the gaming world. I will be posting one or more artworks every week and explaining new things I learn when working with the artworks. This is my first artwork I printed:

Skull 1 Signed and watermarked 2

I’m going to be copyrighting all my artworks for now, however, if anyone are interested in using my artworks then feel free to contact me through the blog about what you’re going to be using it for. I much rather have people enjoy my artworks rather then it being visually blocked behind a giant watermark just to annoy people, but I also want some control over what they are used for. I am going to be looking into Creative Commons in the future.

If anyone has any questions or want to get in touch, just contact me and I’ll get to you shortly! Thank you for reading and have a good week you gorgeous people!

– Markus Mjelde (Construcker)

Game jams: A culmination of art forms

splashside

Game jams are events where people with different skill sets create games in a short amount of time, either in groups or by themselves. These skill sets are usually different variations of music/sound, voice acting, programming, painting/drawing, 3d-modelling and story/dialogue writing. In most cases, a game jam has a certain theme or concept that the games should revolve around.

This weekend, I participated in Bergen Game Jam, which is a part of Global Game Jam, a worldwide jam with sites in all corners of the globe. Our team had a writer (who wrote excellent dialogue in spite of her lack of experience), a 2d artist who likes to draw Tim Burton-esque art, a music student who had never done anything for games, one pure programmer, one programmer who had experience with animation as well, and me, who has experience in a little bit of everything, but mostly programming (I ended up doing mostly level design, and when all the geometry was sketched, I went over to programming).

The theme was revealed to be “transmission”. In the final presentation we saw a lot of interesting concepts based around this, like local co-op games where you have to transmit powers/abilites/screen space to your partner, a vr-game about translating morse code, and many other great games. Our game was based on Nikola Tesla’s Wardenclyffe project, and thus received the name Wardenclyffe. In our game, you had to transmit power to different parts in a ruined Wardenclyffe tower that was haunted by the ghosts of Tomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, to get to the top where you can free their spirits. Our idea started with interpreting the concept of transmission as the movement of electric currents from one object to another, and somewhere in the process, our main storywriter discovered this unfinished project of Tesla’s.

The entire creative process of making this game in 48 hours was heavily shaped by the prescence of so many different art forms; the artist started drawing concept art, which in turn inspired the programmers to make special mechanics and the musician to write tunes and effects, and the storywriter to go in a certain direction, and then all of this influenced level design, which bounced back again to inspire the 2d-artist, and again all of these forms bred inspiration in the others in a beatiful way.

I had a lot of fun participating in this, and i encourage all readers to participate in similar multi-art form creative processes! Below I will provide a link to the game, as well as the websites of Bergen Game Jam and Global Game Jam.

Thank you for reading!

Our game: https://globalgamejam.org/2018/games/wardenclyffe

You can download the game by downloading the zip-file where it says “executable” and unpacking it to you desired destination. Then, open the destination and launch “2.exe”.

Bergen Game Jam: http://www.bergengamejam.org/

1st blog post

Hello, my name is Melodie. I am 23 years old and I am currently studying Information Science. To be honest, I knew little about this subject, all I knew was that it might be a relevant subject for me to take. After going to the first lecture, I found out that we need to write at least 7 to 10 blog posts throughout this semester. I have never written a blog before, so the thought of writing one made me freak out a little bit, because I honestly do NOT know how to write a blog. But if this is what it takes for me to progress not just in this subject but also in general, I welcome you to my very first blog and many more blog posts to come.

After our first four lectures, Mia (this subject’s professor) introduced us to what we will be doing and what we will be learning about in this class. She also introduced us to Network Narratives and Daily Digital Alchemy which we will be using in this class and insisted us to use twitter as well.  This week’s lecture we learned about the history of digital art and what is considerable as a digital art. I think it was interesting because we got to learn why and how digital art started. I think the most compelling topic for me this week was about Dada. I find it fascinating to hear about it’s history of breaking the typical artistic norms and making a new identity for art.

We also made memes in lab this week. Though I really don’t know why making meme is a part of our leaning process. I think it is fun to make, and it made me get to the artistic and sarcastic side om me. I guess this helps us to widen and challenge our imagination just by making a simple digital art.

I am not that active in social media generally, but after being introduced to netnarr I have made a little contribution by making and sharing a meme and DDA in twitter to start with.

This is the very first meme I made in lab.

meme1

I also tried to do a DDA this week. Again, I find this funny because I actually like making this type of “daily challenges”, and I would love to do more of this daily digital alchemy challenges.

#DDA136

I think that by learning to use social media like blog and twitter, we learn to use social medias as a tool for sharing and gathering ideas, and I think that is what digital culture is about. It is about connecting to people, showing what you have created and just being proud of it.

1st blog post

Hello, my name is Melodie. I am 23 years old and I am currently studying Information Science. To be honest, I knew little about this subject, all I knew was that it might be a relevant subject for me to take. After going to the first lecture, I found out that we need to write at least 7 to 10 blog posts throughout this semester. I have never written a blog before, so the thought of writing one made me freak out a little bit, because I honestly do NOT know how to write a blog. But if this is what it takes for me to progress not just in this subject but also in general, I welcome you to my very first blog and many more blog posts to come.

After our first four lectures, Mia (this subject’s professor) introduced us to what we will be doing and what we will be learning about in this class. She also introduced us to Network Narratives and Daily Digital Alchemy which we will be using in this class and insisted us to use twitter as well.  This week’s lecture we learned about the history of digital art and what is considerable as a digital art. I think it was interesting because we got to learn why and how digital art started. I think the most compelling topic for me this week was about Dada. I find it fascinating to hear about it’s history of breaking the typical artistic norms and making a new identity for art.

We also made memes in lab this week. Though I really don’t know why making meme is a part of our leaning process. I think it is fun to make, and it made me get to the artistic and sarcastic side om me. I guess this helps us to widen and challenge our imagination just by making a simple digital art.

I am not that active in social media generally, but after being introduced to netnarr I have made a little contribution by making and sharing a meme and DDA in twitter to start with.

This is the very first meme I made in lab.

meme1

I also tried to do a DDA this week. Again, I find this funny because I actually like making this type of “daily challenges”, and I would love to do more of this daily digital alchemy challenges.

#DDA136

I think that by learning to use social media like blog and twitter, we learn to use social medias as a tool for sharing and gathering ideas, and I think that is what digital culture is about. It is about connecting to people, showing what you have created and just being proud of it.

So this is it, eh?

I’m not really sure how to start this, but here we go:

The last two weeks have been pretty hectic on my part. The semester started, Telenorligaen is starting again and I had to work as well. As a part of my studies I’m taking a course that’s named DiKult103: Networked Narratives or #NetNarr as we’ll call it from here on out.

Something that might come in handy is knowing who “I” am in this case, we’ll do it short and sweet. I’m Didrik Helland (26) from Bergen, Norway.

This week we’ve been talking about stuff like genres of digital art and memes. We’ll be talking about other subjects like video games and electronic literature later in the semester, so for now we’ll focus on the world of digital art. As a part of this course we have to write a blog, this blog to be precise. I guess I struggle with stuff like this as I usually don’t like to give away too much of myself on the internet. Perhaps I overshare in the flesh and then end up compensating online? Who knows. It feels weird to say that, that I don’t share stuff online since I actually share a lot. I share more than I care to know. “Luckily” I only see this through weirdly specific ads that I get on my websites of choice, like when you make a joke in a chat about Crocs or something like that, then having to spend the next 2 days looking at camouflage colored Crocs with the title “Crocs for MEN!” because that’s what they know about me. Well, I’m tired and my laptop is running out of juice so: 

I’ll be off, have a good one!

 

Didrik Helland